Disclaimer: Paid for by Blank Check. Blatant Deception. Vote No on 73. © 2018

Don't be deceived
Colorado

A committed group of business associations, advocacy organizations, and individuals have formed a powerful coalition opposed to Amendment 73.  

 

THE COALITION INCLUDES: Colorado Bankers Association, Colorado Restaurant Association, Associated General Contractors, Colorado Association of Mechanical and Plumbing Contractors, Colorado Association of Realtors, Denver Metro Commercial Association of Realtors, Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, Colorado Competitive Council, Ready Colorado, Independence Institute, Colorado Rising Action, Colorado Farm Bureau, Americans for Prosperity, Building Jobs4Colorado, South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce.

Join the Coalition to
Fight Amendment 73

CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIRS: 

Dave Davia, Executive Vice President & CEO at Colorado Association of Mechanical & Plumbing Contractors

 

Katie Kruger, CEO of the Denver Metro Commercial Association of Realtors

 

Luke Ragland, President, Ready Colorado

"What were they thinking?"

Updated: Sep 17, 2018


The Sad Truth: Amendment 73 strips first responder budgets and fails to provide guaranteed funding for teacher salaries, more teachers or instructional dollars for students in the classroom.


What were they thinking? As authors of Amendment 73 rushed to draft a massive $1.6 Billion tax hike for the people and businesses of Colorado, they must have overlooked the impact the initiative will have on our valuable first responder teams and other public services.


Amendment 73 is a threat to our communities. It is a funding mechanism created to siphon dollars away from the budgets for firefighters, sheriff’s departments, public health agencies, emergency medical services, libraries, parks, recreation facilities, water districts and more.


“Amendment 73 sets up a separate property tax system for school district taxes. Literature supporting the amendment claims that only school district property taxes are affected by the changes, and that property taxes levied by other taxing authorities would be affected. That isn’t necessarily so.” - Larimer County Accessor Steve Miller.

“Fire chiefs, public health professionals, mayors, county commissioners, city officials — and all others who use property taxes to serve the public — need to learn more about Amendment 73. If enacted, their agencies will make do with less,” warns The Gazette editorial board.


There’s no doubt about it, Coloradans believe in providing solid educational opportunity for students. We also want to reward our teachers with competitive, fair compensation.


But 73’s A Missed opportunity. Its authors cheated Colorado educators and students. The measure does not guarantee tax dollars raised from the massive tax hike will benefit students, enhance graduation rates or make it to teacher paychecks.


Blank Check: Colorado ranks 5th in the nation for the cost of administration and 47th in the nation in terms of dollars spent on instruction. Education leaders must bring those statistics into balance … and not by robbing Peter to pay Paul.


“By exempting education – the largest program in the state budget – from the state’s voter-approved spending caps, 73 is a backdoor scheme to allow big-spending politicians to cost-shift and spend unlimited amounts of tax money on other programs also.” SOURCE: The Economic Impacts of a $1.6 Billion Tax Increase to Spend on Education

Safety First: NOT! The safety of our school children and our community must simply be our top priority. What were the authors thinking as they drafted a proposal that fails to fund our first responders? Did they receive poor counsel?

Or perhaps in their over zealousness, they simply overlooked the value of law enforcement officers, firefighters and emergency medical personnel for the wellbeing of students and our community.


Especially surprising … given the warranted public outcry for enhanced safety measures in our schools.


Amendment 73 is deceptive. Regardless of proponents’ claims most taxpayers “would not pay anything” in reality, all Colorado homeowners will see an increase in property taxes. The very property taxes 73 will divert away from all community services currently funded by such.


The measure sets the property tax assessment rate for school districts at 7.0 percent for residential properties (an increase over projected rate of 6.1%) and decreases the assessment rate to 24.0 percent for most nonresidential properties.

It sets the property tax assessment rate for school districts at 7.0 percent for residential properties (an increase over projected rate of 6.1%) and decreases the assessment rate to 24.0 percent for most nonresidential properties.


Amendment 73 fails everyone: students, teachers, communities and all who use property tax funding to perform services for us.


Vote No on 73. It’s a blank check.